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News & Events

News & Event

Giving Black: Cincinnati — A Rich Legacy of Philanthropy

Greater Cincinnati Foundation (GCF) invites you to join us as we release the report Giving Black: Cincinnati on Thursday, December 6, from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. The report, co-funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and New England Blacks in Philanthropy, is the result of research we commissioned in 2017 to explore the generous, often overlooked history of black philanthropy in our region and identify the giving priorities of our black residents today. 
Greater Cincinnati Foundation (GCF) invites you to join us as we release the report Giving Black: Cincinnati on Thursday, December 6, from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. The report, co-funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and New England Blacks in Philanthropy, is the result of research we commissioned in 2017 to explore the generous, often overlooked history of black philanthropy in our region and identify the giving priorities of our black residents today. More than 300 Greater Cincinnatians completed the survey, and interviews and four focus groups provided additional data.

The research release event will feature a keynote address by Dr. Alandra Washington, Vice President of Quality and Organizational Effectiveness for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Giving Black: Cincinnati will provide a community opportunity to lift up inspirational stories of black philanthropy that spans more than 200 years. At a time when they were excluded from mainstream programs, African Americans created and established their own social services, education programs and charitable organizations.

Those prominent black Cincinnatians included former slave John P. Parker, an entrepreneur, inventor, businessman and philanthropist who became a prominent operator on the Underground Railroad in Ripley, Ohio; Samuel T. Wilcox, who opened a high-end grocery store in Cincinnati which, by the mid-1850s amassed $140,000 in annual sales; Peter H. Clark, a teacher who became principal of Cincinnati’s segregated Gaines High School in 1866, where he trained a generation of African American teachers; and the Rev. Peter Fossett and his wife, Sarah Mayrant Fossett, who together formed the First Baptist Church of Cumminsville. Peter, a former slave of Thomas Jefferson, was also one of Cincinnati’s most prominent caterers and a conductor on the Underground Railroad; Sarah, a civil rights forerunner to Rosa Parks, successfully sued to end segregation for African American women on Cincinnati streetcars after she was denied access in 1860.     

Their legacy of resistance, resilience and stewardship resonates in black giving patterns today, and adds much to the collective narrative of giving to make our community a better place. Please join us as we share this impactful work.

A Legacy of Resistance, Resilience and Stewardship

Giving Black: Cincinnati

Research Release Event

Thursday, December 6, 2018

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

3:30 - 6:30 p.m.

Keynote address by Dr. Alandra Washington,

Vice President of Quality and Organizational Effectiveness for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Opportunities for connection and engagement will follow the presentation.

Register Today!