porno xxx bf hindi
huluhub.com
ankara escort pendik escort
umraniye escort
antalya escort
bonus veren siteler deneme bonusu veren siteler çevrimsiz bonus veren siteler
www.shirl.club
mobil onay whois
 
rss

News & Events

News & Event

Sunshine on a Cloudy Day

It’s not hard to see why Judy Schmitz was selected to be the “sunshine girl” by her Kiwanis group. She’s upbeat, enthusiastic and willing to try new things. In the recent past, she’s fed cheetahs in Africa, learned French, volunteered in Haiti and taught a class at Xavier University.
Judy SchmitzIt’s not hard to see why Judy Schmitz was selected to be the “sunshine girl” by her Kiwanis group. She’s upbeat, enthusiastic and willing to try new things. In the recent past, she’s fed cheetahs in Africa, learned French, volunteered in Haiti and taught a class at Xavier University.

Her energy served her well as a teacher and former junior high principal. Judy started her career as a teacher, then administrator, and is retiring as curriculum specialist for Mariemont City Schools.

Eleven years ago, this cheerful educator and her husband’s lives were forever changed when he was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Unsurprisingly, the sunshine girl and her equally determined husband Jerry spent his last months as advocates for others suffering from the same illness.

“He was very positive the whole time,” Judy said. “And being an engineer came into play – he was always three months ahead of the disease. The day he needed a cane, he ordered his scooter. When he used the scooter, he ordered his wheelchair.”

Judy recalls that they were fortunate. Friends and family rallied around them. They had “good jobs, great insurance benefits and financial security.” As they met others fighting the disease, they saw how the disease took a toll on families, both financially and emotionally. “We were dealt a terrible loss, but were lucky with the way we got to deal with it,” she said. “We had the privilege of focusing on making Jerry’s final days comfortable and filled with family and friends.”

Judy explains that the ALS Association assists patients with medical equipment, communication devices, and emotional support.

She’s grateful.

“That is why that association continues to be one of the primary targets of my planned giving program,” she said. Judy remained active in the ALS organization after Jerry’s death nine years ago. She eventually took a break from it – “it got too hard” – but she’s returning as chair of its local advocacy group. She also volunteers with The First Tee, a nonprofit organization based around golf that teaches children character and values through the game.

A Columbus, Ohio native, Judy says she was raised in a household where you give back of your time and skills. “My dad, a retired firefighter, is the kindest and most giving person I’ve ever known,” she said. “He and my mother were sensitive to the needs of others and willing to offer their time and talents as needed.” Herdad, at 82, still volunteers twice a week at the food bank her brother manages.

Judy recently opened a donor advised fund at GCF.

“I’m pleased with my fund because it’s easy to manage, to monitor,” she said.

“Just by talking to the people at GCF, you get ideas about how to give. I’m just a regular person and this is a great way for regular people to keep track of their charitable dollars,” she added.

Judy remains close to Jerry’s adult sons, Scott and Joe, and often travels with them. She’s looking forward to an upcoming vacation that involves hiking, kayaking and horseback riding. She claims she’s not talented in any of these pastimes but is up to the challenge.

What would you expect from a woman nicknamed sunshine?

Printed in the 2010 Annual Report



Comments are closed.
Location

720 E. Pete Rose Way,
Suite 120
Cincinnati, OH 45202
Directions

Contact

513-241-2880
Email Us


Stay Connected.

Sign-up to receive news and
learn about upcoming events.